Anthology – Peoples’ Plan for Life, Now and Forever …


Posted on August 25th, by A. Robert Johnson in Foreign Policy. Comments Off on Anthology – Peoples’ Plan for Life, Now and Forever …

John Perkins Confessions of a Corporate Hit Man, ©2004 by John Perkins ISBN 1-57675-301-8 developed a conscience during his career. He admits to having none at its onset. He developed one over many years as, in the title of his book, he learned to “lean on” leaders in the world who had control over resources coveted by American corporations. If his “persuasion” was insufficient to the task, the “jackals” would take over. The result was death for a significant number of heads of state around the world, at the hands of agencies of the United States government, out of sight of its citizens, but ultimately discovered and proved. Nothing in Perkins’ accounts has been refuted by any of these agencies. They continue to behave without restraint and in fact, as seen contemporaneously are fully empowered by the Executive Branch of the U.S. Government. The drones, the “contractors” and “extraordinary rendition” have made us a pariah among nations, from one president to the next. So who is the prisoner? Who the jailer? Are we the citizens helpless to set matters right? We act as if we are. Perhaps John Perkins new-found conscience will help change that.

This is how he got started. Seeking ways to avoid being drafted during the Vietnam War he joined the Peace Corps and received an assignment to Ecuador. After sufficient time to bond with indigenous people who subsisted on farming and fishing, he had occasion to meet…“Einar Greve, a vice president at Chas. T. Main, Inc. (MAIN), an international consulting firm that kept a very low profile and that was in charge of studies to determine whether the World Bank should lend Ecuador and its neighboring countries billions of dollars to build hydroelectric dams and other infrastructure projects. Einar also was a colonel in the U.S. Army Reserve.”

They bonded. At age twenty-six, in 1971, Perkins was offered a position as an economist with MAIN…

“Einar had hired me as an economist, but I was soon to learn that my real job went far beyond that, and that it was in fact closer to James Bond’s [world] than I ever could have guessed.

[Chapter 2: “In for Life” – Page 12] “In legal parlance, MAIN would be called a closely held corporation; roughly 5 percent of its two thousand employees owned the company. These were referred to as partners or associates, and their position was coveted. Not only did the partners have power over everyone else, but also they made the big bucks. Discretion was their hallmark; they dealt with heads of state and other chief executive officers who expect their consultants, like their attorneys and psychotherapists, to honor a strict code of absolute confidentiality. Talking with the press was taboo. It simply was not tolerated. As a consequence, hardly anyone outside MAIN had ever heard of us, although many were familiar with our competitors, such as Arthur D. Little, Stone & Webster, Brown & Root, Halliburton, and Bechtel…

“Einar took frequent trips that usually lasted only two to three days. No one talked much about them or seemed to know where he had gone. When he was in the office, he often invited me to sit with him for a few minutes over coffee…’ You needn’t worry,’ he said. “We have high expectations from you. I was in Washington recently…’ His voice trailed off and he smiled inscrutably. ‘In any case, you know we have a big project in Kuwait. It’ll be a while before you leave for Indonesia. I think you should use some of your time to read up on Kuwait. The Boston Public Library is a great resource, and we can get you passes to the MIT and Harvard libraries.’

“After that I spent many hours in those libraries…I became familiar with Kuwait as well as with many books on economic statistics, published by the United Nations, the International Monetary Fund (IMF), and the World Bank. I knew that I would be expected to produce econometric models for Indonesia and Java, and I decided that I might as well get started by doing one for Kuwait.

“However, my BS in business administration had not prepared me as an econometrician, so I spent a lot of time trying to figure out how to go about it. I went so far as to enroll in a couple of courses on the subject. In the process, I discovered that statistics can be manipulated to produce a large array of conclusions, including those substantiating the predilections of the analyst.





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